Introduction to Environmental Geosciences header
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Introduction to Environmental Geoscience
Homework #2 for Fall 2008

Due 9 September 2008

Late homework will cost 15 points per week or part of a week it is late.


How much are you influencing the environment?

Working in teams of six, please answer the following questions. I am not interested in your personal information, just the average and spread of values for your team. Use data from your apartment divided by the number of people in the apartment if you have the information. Or use information from your family home, divided by the number of people living at your family home.

In answering the questions, give the mean and maximum and minimum values for one month of use.

  1. How much electricity did you use in a month? Give answer in kilowatt-hours. See also What is a kilowatt-hour?
  2. How much natural gas or propane did you use in the same month? Give answer in thousands of cubic feet (mcf) or gallons.
  3. How many gallons of gasoline did you use in your car in a month? Give answer in gallons.
  4. Many pounds of CO2 were emitted into the atmosphere to meet your energy needs? To answer the question:
    1. Multiply kilowatt-hours (kWh) by 1.34 pounds/kWh.
    2. Multiply natural gas in 1000 cf (mcf) by 121 pounds/mcf. Multiple gallons of propane by 12.7 pounds/gallon.
    3. Multiply gallons of gasoline by 19.5 pounds/gallon.
    4. Add up all the CO2 emissions to determine how many pounds of CO2 were emitted into the atmosphere to meet your energy needs.
  5. How many gallons of water did you use in the same month? Give answer in gallons.

If you don't have exact values, show how you estimated values. For example, you may not know how many gallons of gasoline you bought, but you many know about how many dollars you spent. Divide the dollar value by an estimate of the price per gallon to get the number of gallons.

Revised on: 20 August, 2008

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